Design Awards: 2018: Merit

Thirty Broadwick, London

© Andy Stagg Photography

Architect
Emrys Architects

Structural Engineer
Heyne Tillett Steel

Steelwork Contractor
Severfield

Main Contractor
BAM Construction

Client
Great Portland Estates plc

Thirty Broadwick is a new 120,000ft2 building that offers optimised lettable floor areas within Soho’s tight streetscape and replaces a tired building with one that reflects the district’s character. It now offers exemplar West End office space, with large flexible floorplates, that meets the client’s exacting sustainability standards. The upper floors step back creating large outdoor terraces which provide valuable outdoor amenity space.

The wellness of occupants was a primary design objective, reflected in generous and well-appointed spaces, incorporating a natural ventilation strategy that has helped to make Thirty Broadwick an exemplar sustainable building with an EPC ‘A’ and BREEAM ‘Excellent’ rating.

Judges’ Comment

A deceptively simple project where structural steel is showcased as the ‘go to’ system for maximising the development potential on such heavily constrained sites. Long-span, column-free interiors and additional floor area are achieved within planning height constraints determined by a previous consent through innovative deflection control during construction and the inventive integration of structure and services.

Victoria Palace Theatre Refurbishment, London

© Philip Vile

Architect
Aedas Arts Team

Structural Engineer
Conisbee

Steelwork Contractor
SDM Fabrication Ltd

Main Contractor
8Build Ltd

Client
Delfont Mackintosh

The Grade II listed Victoria Palace Theatre has been remodelled and refurbished to ensure that it remains a prominent part of London’s West End theatre scene for years to come.

The main objectives were to maximise the potential of the stage and fly tower, extend the back-of-house facilities, improve the comfort of the auditorium to seat 1,528 and maximise the amount of front-of-house areas, whilst maintaining the building’s historic features.

The structural works included installing a 6m wide by 26m high extension to the fly tower, extending the east wing, and strengthening works throughout the existing building.

Judges’ Comment

The remodelling of the theatre has been extremely challenging, ensuring that it will remain a prominent venue for years to come. The whole team has worked in a truly collaborative manner, that was essential due to the evolving design. Steelwork was key to dealing with the many logistical construction challenges due to limited space and access.

Seventy Wilson, London

Architect
astudio

Structural Engineer
Heyne Tillett Steel

Steelwork Contractor
TSI Structures Ltd

Main Contractor
Willmott Dixon

Client
Stanhope

A 1980s office building has been fully refurbished and now benefits from a 25% increase in floor area. The space has been rationalised and two new storeys have been added, all with an efficient structural design dramatically reducing the carbon footprint.

The works involved extending the height of the building from five to seven storeys, building a four-storey addition to one elevation and remodelling the circulation cores to provide more office space and an additional lift.

The exposed steel frame in this modern ‘raw’ building is painted bright red to emphasize and celebrate the structure.

Judges’ Comment

The team cleverly added 25% floor area to this 1980s office without needing to strengthen the existing steel structure. The original steelwork, previously encased in concrete, was exposed to make it a statement of the building. This two-storey extension is a fine example of how testing and good engineering can give a steel building new life.

Walthamstow Wetlands

© Heini Schneebeli

Architects
Witherford Watson Mann and Kinnear Landscape Architects

Structural Engineer
Entuitive

Steelwork Contractor
Gorge Fabrications Ltd

Main Contractor
Rooff Ltd

Client
London Borough of Waltham Forest

Walthamstow Wetlands is Europe’s largest urban wetlands and expects to host 250,000 visitors in its first year. As part of the project to provide the facilities necessary for opening the site to free public access, two disused infrastructure buildings, the locally listed Engine House and the Grade II listed Coppermill Tower, have been adapted for visitor use, providing an exhibition space, an education room, café, toilets and a viewing platform.

The structural works included a boardwalk entrance, new first floor and spiral escape stair in the Engine House, and a new viewing platform and staircase in the Coppermill Tower.

Judges’ Comment

The team has successfully given a nod to the former industrial heritage of the building through the use of steel in many manifestations to highlight wayfinding and new interventions throughout this sensitive conversion. The balustrading, made from simple welded plate elements, proves an effective unifying element to the balconies and external spaces.

1 & 2 London Wall Place

Architect
make

Structural Engineer
WSP UK Ltd

Steelwork Contractor
William Hare

Main Contractor
Multiplex Construction Europe

Client
London Wall Place Limited Partnership

London Wall Place is one of the most important recent developments in the City of London comprising two strikingly contemporary landmark commercial buildings providing 500,000m2 of Grade A office space.

Steel lies at the heart of the development, over 7,000 tonnes of it. Its use throughout is both impressive and dramatic; both buildings feature extensive cantilevered steelwork and deep transfer structures at Level 2 which allow them to extend well beyond the boundary of the two-storey common basement.

The two buildings rise to 12 storeys and 16 storeys with their steel superstructures laterally stabilised by concrete cores.

Judges’ Comment

The large scheme, comprising two new office buildings combined with carefully integrated public realm, provides a new setting along 250m of London Wall. The use of steel has been instrumental in enabling the two buildings to cantilever out over the existing road. A 5m deep mega truss at Level 2, with enormous steel members passing through it, offers the opportunity for a highly unusual
new dining space.

Manchester Victoria Redevelopment

© Martine Hamilton Knight

Architect
BDP

Structural Engineer
Arcadis Consulting (UK) Ltd

Steelwork Contractor
Severfield

Main Contractor
Morgan Sindall – Manchester (Construction)

Client
Network Rail

Manchester’s Victoria Station has been transformed to increase passenger capacity. The redevelopment was a challenging project within an existing live railway station around several Grade II listed features, with possessions limited from 1.00am to 4.30am daily. As well as the ETFE roof over the refurbished concourse, the project also included a 60m Arena walkway over the live train platforms.

The 1,800t, 8,500m2 ETFE roof is supported by 15 steel ribs, the largest spanning 95m. The lifts for this project were challenging; the largest rib weighed 84 tonnes and required a crane with a 74m radius.

Judges’ Comment

The tubular steel ribs forming the new roof create an effective transition between the curving railway tracks and the adjacent buildings. Despite severe constraints the steelwork was erected on schedule with the station remaining operational throughout. The result is a completely transformed space, with the exposed steelwork a dominant feature.

101 The Embankment, Salford

© Hufton + Crow

Architect
Flanagan Lawrence

Structural Engineer
Ramboll

Steelwork Contractor
Elland Steel Structures Ltd

Client
Ask Real Estate

This project is situated on a plot once occupied by Exchange Station that closed in 1969. The Grade II listed sandstone façade viaduct that once supported the station has been retained to form a grand base for a new office building, which sits at plinth level 9m above a significant new area of public realm.

In contrast to the viaduct, the modern steel and glass office building appears as a lightweight, highly polished jewel offering over 165,000ft2 of Grade A offices on 10 floors above a 442-space car park podium over three floors.

Judges’ Comment

This steel and glass 11-storey office building contains a substantial high-spec multi-storey car park, together with retail and workspace units, tied together with an innovative ‘hub’ circulation building. This is a complex structure, but the judges were impressed with the overall economy of the building, taking into account the need to incorporate existing façades, together with the complexities of the transition between the car park and office levels.

Walkway Bridges, London Wall Place

Architect
make

Structural Engineer
WSP UK Ltd

Steelwork Contractor
William Hare

Main Contractor
Multiplex Construction Europe

Client
London Wall Place Limited Partnership

During the construction of London Wall Place, some of the existing heavy 1960s Barbican Highwalks had to be removed as part of the demolition and enabling works. These have now been reinstated by stylish walkways fabricated in weathering steel.

The six new footbridges suspended from the new buildings are an aesthetic and functional response to the problem of pedestrian movement in an overcrowded urban realm. In terms of their slimmer, more sculptural form, material and colour, they provide a vivid contrast with the surrounding buildings and enhance the contemporary styling of London Wall Place.

Judges’ Comment

Individually the six bridges that form this walkway may not catch the eye. However, even though structurally different, through uniform language they cleverly work as one. The weathered steel gives a warmth, which combined with the different structural forms, creates an urban landscape that works with the surroundings to produce lovely public spaces above and below.