2020 National Finalists

Structural Steel Design Awards

One Bank Street, Canary Wharf

PROJECT TEAM

Architect:
Kohn Pedersen Fox

Structural Engineer:
Arup

Steelwork Contractor:
William Hare

Main Contractor:
Canary Wharf Contractors

Client:
Canary Wharf Group

One Bank Street is a striking 27-storey commercial building on the prestigious Canary Wharf estate offering 60,000m² of high-quality office space including three levels of state-of-the-art trading floors, a retail unit at ground level, public realm, a nd basement car and cycle parking.

Designed to achieve a BREEAM ‘ Outstanding’ rating, the steel-framed structure sits atop a triple 1 6m-deep basement and gains its stability from a large centrally-positioned core. Sustainability was a key design element of One Bank Street which includes measures to save approximately 352 tonnes of carbon annually and a 55% reduction in water compared to a typical office building.

This major development in the heart of London’s Docklands posed some significant construction challenges due to the complex geometry on the lower levels. These required some heavy cantilevers, bespoke detailing for the steelwork, and close cooperation between steelwork and cladding contractors, resulting in an eye-catching structure providing high quality office space.

Judges’ comment

Barton Square, intu Trafford Centre, Manchester

PROJECT TEAM

Architect:
Corstorphine + Wright, Leach Rhodes Walker

Structural Engineer:
Mott MacDonald, Cameron Darroch Associates

Steelwork Contractor:
S H Structures Ltd

Main Contractor:
VINCI Construction UK

Client:
Intu Properties plc

The refurbishment of Barton Square includes the addition of two 36m-wide glazed barrel vault roofs over the main malls, providing a more user friendly experience for shoppers, and a 32m-diameter central dome that creates a stunning focal point towering above an ornate water feature. The upper levels of the centre have additional steelwork framing and stairs along with four smaller roof structures to extend the available retail space.

The critical interface between the steelwork and the glazing system called for strict tolerances to be achieved, and construction was carried out outside normal trading h ours to allow the centre to remain open throughout.

Safely installing a new central dome a nd glazed barrel-vaulted roofs over this section of the Trafford C entre, while it was kept open t o the public throughout, was a formidable logistical challenge. This w as met by delivering and installing most of the steelwork, including the 3 6m vaulted beams, in constrained night-time operations.

Judges’ comment

Boeing GoldCare Aircraft Hangar, Gatwick Airport

PROJECT TEAM

Architect:
D5 Architects LLP

Structural Engineer:
Mott MacDonald

Main Contractor:
John Sisk & Son

Client:
Boeing United Kingdom Limited

This new maintenance hangar provides servicing facilities for Boeing’s current and future fleet of aircraft at Gatwick Airport. Comprising m ore than 3,000 tonnes of structural steelwork, the hangar provides a 1 5,000m 2 dual-bay wide body facility a nd 3,000m 2 of support offices, storage and plant space.

Rooflights, to reduce reliance on artificial light, and 900m 2 of photovoltaic (PV) solar panels on the roof contributed to achieving a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ rating for the hangar, while design development saved an estimated 635 tonnes of steel. This in addition to savings in temporary works and foundations equated to a carbon reduction of 1,045 tonnes.

This maintenance building for Boeing is built in the challenging environment of a live airport. The design team worked closely throughout optimising structural efficiency. Deep steel trusses span up to 75m creating a vast column-free space. The trusses, supported on lattice columns, and braced elevation columns form a primary stability system enabling a n efficient construction with few temporary supports.

Judges’ comment

The Balfour, Kirkwall, Orkney

PROJECT TEAM

Architect:
Keppie Design

Structural Engineer:
Aecom

Steelwork Contractor:
BHC Ltd

Main Contractor:
Robertson

Client:
NHS Orkney

The £64 million Balfour Hospital provides a state-of-the-art clinical environment for the delivery of essential health care services to the Isle of Orkney, significantly reducing the number of people travelling to the Scottish Mainland for routine care.

In a challenging and exposed location, the building is designed with protection and shielding from the elements in mind. The curve of the building protects the main entrance s pace and inpatient accommodation while referencing the ancient architectural form of Skara Brae.

The speed of steel construction was vital to the project and achieved an early weathertight position to allow internal trades to commence.

The curved forms of this new general hospital in the Orkney Islands reference the circular, sheltering prehistoric structures found on t he islands while making a positive contribution to the local community. A steel frame, prefabricated on the mainland, allowed speedy completion and reduced vulnerability of the construction programme to extreme weather conditions. Team members collaborated on an integrated BIM model to integrate complex services within the geometry of the structure.

Judges’ comment

National Infrastructure Laboratory, University of Southampton

PROJECT TEAM

Architect:
Grimshaw Architects

Structural Engineer:
Buro Happold

Main Contractor:
Wates Construction Limited

Client:
University of Southampton

The £48 million National Infrastructure Laboratory (NIL) provides researchers and students with state-of-the-art equipment to facilitate world-leading research to improve the efficiency of existing infrastructure as well as develop more cost-effective ways of constructing new infrastructure. The NIL hosts over 100 academics and researchers in five major laboratories and three floors of offices.

A full-height atrium provides daylighting and passive natural ventilation, reducing energy demand and enhancing the wellbeing of the academic staff. The steel frame provides inherent flexibility of spaces for the lifetime of the structure and the project has achieved a BREEAM ‘ Excellent’ rating demonstrating its low impact design.

The Laboratory, which houses a 3m geotechnical centrifuge and large structures laboratory, is part of Boldrewood Innovation Campus, an internationally-recognised community delivering the highest standards of engineering excellence. The project uses different materials, each complementing the other. The steel elements providing open clear s pans and elegant feature staircases. The result is a well-engineered and engaging showcase for state-of-the-art research.

Judges’ comment

The Wave, Coventry

PROJECT TEAM

Architect:
FaulknerBrowns Architects

Structural Engineer:
Engenuiti

Steelwork Contractor:
Billington Structures Ltd

Main Contractor:
Buckingham Group Contracting Ltd

Client:
CV Life

Located adjacent to Coventry’s 70m-high Grade II-listed Christchurch Spire, The Wave water park is a high-quality destination, accessible to all and houses multiple water slides, a lazy river, wave pool, day spa, 25m-long swimming pool, 120 station gym, dance studio and squash courts.

The pool ride hall is a cylindrical, multi-level, open-plan structure which forms the main architectural theme of the building. Large open-plan spaces on the lower floors facilitate future re-purposing of spaces, whilst the roof has been designed to enable t he rides to be re-configured. The compact nature of the building minimises the building volume and energy demand.

Forming the focus of an inner-city regeneration programme, this major public leisure facility responds to an adjacent historic church ruin with considerable panache, colour and profile. The high point is a fantastical freeform leisure pool with fiume rides supported within and from a complex diagrid roof structure.

Judges’ comment

Drake Circus The Barcode, Plymouth

PROJECT TEAM

Architect:
Corstorphine + Wright

Structural Engineer:
Evolve Consulting Engineers

Steelwork Contractor:
BHC Ltd

Main Contractor:
McLaren Construction Group

Client:
British Land

The Drake Circus Leisure Complex, otherwise known as The Barcode due to its striking façade, forms part of the ongoing transformation of Plymouth’s city centre. The structure, measuring 130m by 50m in plan, forms a real landmark and houses a 12-screen cinema stacked above 13 restaurants, a large indoor golf leisure facility, a sky-bar and several levels of car parking.

With a structural grid changing up the building to suit efficient layouts for the auditoriums, retail units and car parking, and a planning height restriction, the steel frame is necessarily complex with offset bracing, transfer structures and shallow composite beams.

A steel frame was the natural choice for this highly integrated mixed-use scheme incorporating a range of leisure uses over car parking in this tricky city-centre site. The judges were impressed with the collaborative approach of the team: sharing of digital models was key to the success of quality and coordination as well as the development of critical construction stage modelling.

Judges’ comment

Bridgewater Place Wind Amelioration Scheme, Leeds

PROJECT TEAM

Architect:
Chetwoods Architects

Structural Engineer:
Buro Happold

Steelwork Contractor:
S H Structures Ltd

Main Contractor:
Lendlease

Client:
CPPI Bridgewater Place LP

Bridgewater Place is a landmark structure and the tallest building in Leeds. Topped out in 2005 the building’s shape accelerates winds i n severe weather to the extent that pedestrians experienced real difficulties walking nearby, with adjacent roads and main entrances to the building having to be closed for safety reasons.

As the prevailing westerly wind reaches the building it is deflected downward to ground level, this is known as ‘downwash’. The wind mitigation measures comprising a series of perforated metal wind baffles, canopies and screens ameliorate the ‘ downwash’, improving the environment for pedestrians, road users and the occupants of Bridgewater Place.

This wind-swept urban space has been significantly improved for pedestrians and road users alike b y a series of structural steel wind baffies and screens. Designed to withstand vehicle impact loading, construction was further complicated b y restricted site access at this very busy intersection.

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